LA Painting Lessons and the Benefits of Art

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collage by Emily LaMarque, BertaArt student
Collage by Emily LaMarque, LA Painting Lessons BertaArt student.

Art classes in schools help students improve across the curriculum. There is finally some research that is starting to prove that. In The New York Times, a study was reported in the article “Guggenheim Study Suggests Arts Education Benefits Literacy Skill” by Randy Kennedy. It just seems that such reports only come out every once in awhile. The news that is reported more regularly points toward cutting art classes from schools because they believe that schools need to concentrate more on reading, writing and arithmetic.

The problem is that these decisions are normally made by people who have no idea about the education process. All they understand are money and regulations. When we place our problems in the hands of legislatures, that’s what we can expect. Politicians take a look at the schools and see an art budget. They ask what impact art has on our students. Do LA painting lessons matter? But, not enough studies back the fact that art impacts learning across the curriculum. Art therapy, sometimes called expressive art or art psychology, encourages self-discovery and emotional growth. It is a two-part process, involving both the creation of art and the discovery of its meaning.

LA painting lessons are truly beneficial. Rooted in Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung’s theories of the subconscious and unconscious, art therapy is based on the premise that visual symbols and images are the most accessible and natural form of communication to the human experience. Patients are encouraged to visualize, and then create, the thoughts and emotions that they can’t express verbally. The resulting artwork is then reviewed, and its meaning interpreted by the patient. The analysis of the artwork typically enables a patient to gain some level of insight into their feelings and allows them to work through these issues in a constructive manner. Art therapy is typically practiced in conjunction with individual, group, or family psychotherapy.